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See the campus events calendar for a complete listing.

Kate Coles

Kate Coles

HUMANITIES HAPPY HOUR
“The Earth is Not Flat” with Kate Coles, professor of English and former Utah Poet Laureate
Tuesday, March 19, 5:00 p.m.
Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square (south end)
The final Humanities Happy Hour of the academic year features Katharine Coles who, in 2010, sailed across the Drake Passage to spend a month at a tiny Antarctic science station under the auspices of the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program. “The Earth Is Not Flat” is her collection of poems written about her adventure. In it she continues her meditation on reality and our place in it, using as her vehicles both the natural world and the human-created worlds of art, history and science. For more information contact the College of Humanities or call 801-581-6214

 


art_gopnik-adam_042007[1]ADAM GOPNIK: “ANGELS and AGES”
Annual Sterling McMurrin Lecture: A talk about Darwin, Lincoln, and modern life
Wednesday, March 20, 7:00 p.m.
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building, Free
On Feb. 12, 1809, two babies were born an ocean apart: Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin. Adam Gopnik reveals these icons of emancipation and evolution as ordinary family men with ambitions, faults, passions and brilliant ideas that helped define the spirit of a new world. Discover how our modern world has been shaped by their principles of democracy and innovative science. Gopnik is a leading cultural essayist and noted author, best known as a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. For more information, contact the Honors College or call 801-581-7383.

 

ramadanTARIQ RAMADAN ADDRESSES ARAB SPRING AND PEACE
Oxford Islamic Studies Scholar Kicks Off Lecture Series
Wednesday and Thursday, March 20-21
Islam and Human Rights: How will the Arab Spring bring Peach to the Middle East?
Wednesday, March 20, 7:00 p.m., Salt Lake Public Library, free

The Needs of Ethics when Dealing with an Islamic Legal System
Thursday, March 21, Noon, Marriott Library, free
Ramadan’s two lectures will be the first of a series of talks exploring “Pathways to Peace.” Ramadan is professor of contemporary Islamic studies at Oxford University and a fellow of St. Anthony’s College. He is also director of the Center for Research on Islamic Legislation and Ethics in Doha, Qatar. Ramadan is widely viewed as one of the most influential global thinkers in the world. His most recent book is “The Arab Awakening, Islam and the New Middle East,” published in 2012. Find out more here.

 

TAKING SCIENCE TO PRISON
Thursday, March 21, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Orangerie, Red Butte Garden
Plan to attend this discussion to learn about a project to teach prisoners about science and give them job training in recycling, organic gardening, composting and other skills—part of a trend toward environmental sustainability in prisons. Speakers include Nalini Nadkarni, director of the U’s Center for Science and Mathematics Education, which is launching the Utah project; Carri LeRoy and Dan Pacholke, Sustainability in Prisons Project co-directors; Craig Ulrich, a Nevada graduate student, former inmate and Sustainability in Prisons Project alumnus; and Tami Goetz, Utah state science advisor. For more information contact Antonia or call 801-585-0677.

 

David_EaglemanKNOWING THYSELF: WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A HUMAN WITH A BRAIN
The Nature of Things Keynote Lecture
David Eagleman, professor of neuroscience and psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine
Thursday, March 21, 7:00 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah
If the conscious mind—the part you consider you—accounts for only a fraction of the brain’s function, what is all the rest doing? Our behavior, thoughts and experiences are inseparably linked to a vast, wet, chemical-electrical network called the nervous system. The machinery is utterly alien to us, and yet, somehow, it is us. In the Nature of Things 2013 keynote lecture, neuroscientist and bestselling author David Eagleman takes us into the depths of the subconscious to investigate some of the deepest mysteries about what it means to be human. Eagleman charts the new terrain in neuroscience to help us understand how the many facets of being human all converge on the hidden workings of the human brain. For more information contact Patti Carpenter, call 801-581-6927, or visit the Natural History Museum of Utah website.

 

bonsaiBONSAI SHOW
Friday and Saturday, March 22-23, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Red Butte Garden Visitor Center
Cost: Regular garden admission/Garden members free
Explore the millennia-old art form of Bonsai at Red Butte Garden and learn how to take care of your own tree. Members of the Bonsai Club of Utah will display trees from their collections, answer questions and demonstrate different Bonsai techniques. Trees and supplies will be available for purchase. For more information call 801-585-0556 or check the website.

 

logo-HORIZONTAL GRAYUMARKETBUILDING CREATIVE RELATIONSHIPS: THE U AND THE UTAH COMMUNITY
3rd Annual MUSE Conference
Friday, March 22, 8:00 a.m.-Noon
Olpin Union Saltair Room
Free and open to the campus community
Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend this free event as we explore what new interactions, programs and ideas we can buildor build onbetween the U and rural and urban Utah. Register to attend online. Register here to attend.

 

immortalDO YOU WANT TO LIVE FOREVER?
The Science, Technology and Ethics of Immortality
Friday, March 22, 5:30 p.m., food; 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. program
The Leonardo, 209 East 500 South
Free and open but registration required. Nominal fee for food.
Link here to RSVP or call 801-531-9800, ext. 202 to register.
Free event examines human drive to cheat death—from mummies and frozen heads, to genetic modification and brain uploads. Experts in genetics and ethics. Brain mapping, plus audio and visuals engage live audience. Featured experts from the U include Robert E. Marc, distinguished professor of ophthalmology and director of research, John A. Moran Eye Center; Jeffrey R. Botkin, associate vice president for research, professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities; and Richard M. Cawthon, research associate professor, Department of Human Genetics.

 

 

Mira-4-739x1024[1]AN EVENING WITH MIRA NAIR
BETWEEN TWO WORLDS: CREATING IDENTITY
Annual David P. Gardner Graduate Lecture in the Humanities and Fine Arts
Wednesday, March 27, 5:30 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall
One of Hollywood’s brightest directors, Nair will discuss the craft of film making and the issues she so passionately explores in her films: the tug of competing worlds felt by millions of immigrants, and ways to bridge the gap between cultures, races and genders. Read more about Mira Nair here. 

 

SS Icon 500pxSOCIAL SOUP: WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS?
Wednesday, March 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium
What’s the deal with genetically modified foods?  Hear from a multidisciplinary panel of experts from the U, Utah State University and Westminster College as they present insight from a variety of perspectives and provide an opportunity to learn more about the food you’re eating. Free soup will be available to the first 60 attendees. This event is free and open to the public.

 

PROMO_SymposiumANNUAL STEGNER CENTER SYMPOSIUM: RELIGION, FAITH AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Register by March 22 to save on fee.
Friday & Saturday, April 12-13

Quinney College of Law
The 2013 symposium will focus on the intersection of religion, faith and the environment. Across the world, people of faith are stepping forward to explain why our spiritual connections to the earth demand environmental protection. At the same time, religion remains intertwined with some of the most vexing environmental problems. What is the relationship between religion and environmental degradation and protection? What can people of faith add to the environmental movement? Can religion help bridge the political divide on environmental issues? Registration is required. Visit the website for the full brochure.

 

ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE: STEVEN DOANE, CELLO
Monday, March 25, 7:30 p.m.
School of Music, Libby Gardner Concert Hall, free
A professor of violoncello at Eastman School of Music, cellist Steven Doane will be in residence at the U, offering a cello ergonomics workshop, a master class and a recital. Doane is an internationally known soloist, chamber musician, recording artist and pedagogue. He is the author of “Cello Ergonomics,” and will discuss cello technique, including bowing, shifting, articulation and tension based on the fundamental principles of body motion. Doane’s recital will feature Debussy’s Sonata for Cello and Piano, Lutoslawski’s Grave for Cello and Piano, Tavener’s Threnos and Britten’s Third Suite for Solo Cello.

 

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