David Strayer: Nature nurtures creativity

Hikers more inspired on tests after four days unplugged

 

DavidStrayerGrandGulch[1]Backpackers scored 50 percent better on a creativity test after spending four days in nature disconnected from electronic devices, according to a study by psychologists from the U and University of Kansas. “This is a way of showing that interacting with nature has real, measurable benefits to creative problem-solving that really hadn’t been formally demonstrated before,” says David Strayer, a co-author of the study and professor of psychology at the U. “It provides a rationale for trying to understand what is a healthy way to interact in the world, and that burying yourself in front of a computer 24/7 may have costs that can be remediated by taking a hike in nature.” 

The study by Strayer and University of Kansas psychologists Ruth Ann Atchley and Paul Atchley was published in PLOS ONE, an online journal published by the Public Library of Science. Read the UNews release.

Up close and personal with Orcs and Dwarves

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Sarah Shippobotham

Sarah Shippobotham, associate professor and head of the Department of Theatre’s Actor Training Program recently returned from living in the Shire for eight months. While hobnobbing with hobbits and wizards, Shippobotham’s job was to be a coach in several British accents as well as an expert in the languages of Elvish, Dwarvish, and Black Speech.

Sarah was chosen as a dialect coach for Peter Jackson’s Hobbit Trilogy starting with The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which opened Dec. 14. She most often worked on the second unit, directed by Andy Serkis, yes, Gollum himself. “It was an amazing experience to work on such a huge production,” she says. “This was the first film I have worked on and the sets were incredible. I am used to elaborate sets at the Shaw Festival, but nothing like what I experienced with The Hobbit. …”

Her favorite was the Orcs. “I loved working with the Orcs. I loved the language—Black Speech. I love the ugliness of it. You have to be careful to not go too Russian because it had a sort of Russian feel, but the “L” wasn’t as dark, like Russian. I was always thrilled when there was an Orcish scene.” Sarah worked with one of the main Orcs, Stephen Ure. “We would get together and go over the sounds, words, and intonation for the Orchish and the English and then we would have to rework it when he had his makeup, prosthetics, and teeth in!”

Read the rest of the article on RedThread.

911 is in your pocket

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Campus has never been so connected to emergency service! Did you know that if you call 911 while on campus, you will be transferred directly to U police where they can dispatch assistance immediately? Because of this service, many of the old emergency phones scattered around campus—whose technology was considered cutting edge in 1989—are coming down.

With a cell phone in every pocket, the old campus e-phone system is outdated, unused, and will be removed from most areas (academic campus) and re-evaluated in others (parking garages).

Perhaps you’ve noticed new wraps on some of the old phones with the message: Need 911? It’s in your pocket. If not, you soon will. Consider it a reminder to use 911 on campus. For questions or comments, contact Marty Shaub or call her at 801-585-9311.

Upcoming on campus

Check the listing below to see just some of the many campus events coming up. Click here for the complete campus events calendar.

 

philadelphiaPIONEER THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS
THE PHILADELPHIA STORY

Through Jan. 26
Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre
The young and beautiful Tracy Lord is about to marry what she thinks is the man of her dreams. But when her dashing ex-husband and the two reporters assigned to cover her wedding descend on her family’s country house outside Philadelphia the day before the ceremony, Tracy has a hard time keeping her nuptials—not to mention the dictates of her own heart—on track. Find additional information, including ticket purchase, here. 

 

Tully-Cathey[1]FACULTY RECITAL: TULLY CATHEY, JAZZ GUITAR
Friday, Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m.
Gardner Hall, Dumke Recital Hall
Free
Faculty guitarist and composer Tully Cathey will present a recital featuring works composed by Cathey himself. Though he is the U’s director of classical guitar, Cathey is also acclaimed for his jazz guitar skills, which will be featured on this program, along with current and former Jazz musicians guitarist Keven Johansen, bassist Denson Anguilo, drummer Steve Lyman, and pianist Russell Schmidt.

 

SUNDAYS AT 7 FACULTY SHOWCASE
Sunday, Jan. 13, 7:00 p.m.
Gardner Hall, Libby Gardner Concert Hall, Free
Faculty musicians will perform  Mozart’s Piano Quartet in G minor and Dohnanyi’s Sextet. Pianist Jeffrey Price, violinist James Gardner, violist Robert Baldwin, cellist John Eckstein, clarinetist Kathy Pope, and hornist Steve Proser will present this showcase.

 

small-app-photo-1[1]U MRSEC TO HOST SCIENCE CAFE
Tuesday, Jan. 15, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Legends Pub (677 South 200 West)
From the clothes you wear to the computer you use, almost everything  around you is made of stuff. Materials science is the study of stuff—what it’s made of, how it works, and what we can do with it to improve our lives. Join U researchers studying “stuff” for a Science Café, hosted by the U’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC). A film from the NOVA series, Making Stuff: Smaller will be followed by a Q&A session with U researchers. The event is free and open to the public and all ages are welcome. For more information, contact Chelsey Short at 801-585-9173.

 

robinwilliamsfeature[1]AN EVENING OF SIT DOWN WITH ROBIN WILLIAMS AND DAVID STEINBERG
Wednesday, Jan. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall
Academy Award-winning actor and multiple Grammy Award-winning performer, Robin Williams returns to the stage on January 16, 2013 at Kingsbury Hall when he sits down to “chat” with his old friend, comedian, actor, director and author David Steinberg. Staff and faculty pay no handling fees by purchasing tickets in person at the Kingbury Hall box office or the Olpin Union information desk (savings of $5.50 per ticket, limit 2 per U ID).

Find additional information here.

 

ce_martin[1]smallTHE (RESCHEDULED) ANNUAL REYNOLDS LECTURE
Courtney Martin: Do it Anyway: The New Generation of Activists
Thursday, Jan. 17, 10:00 a.m
Olpin Union Ballroom
Free and open to the public; RSVP required: 801-585-6375
Award-winning author Courtney Martin will examine the challenges of modern activism and illustrate examples of contemporary community heroes. “Martin’s work provides a road map for engaged citizens, both young and old, to move beyond abstract notions of ‘saving the world’ and into concrete, tangible ways in which we can truly impact our communities,” says Sandi Pershing, assistant vice president for continuing education. Martin’s lecture will draw upon her new book, Do It Anyway: The New Generation of Activists. Watch Martin’s TED Talk on Reinventing Feminism, and find additional information on her visit to the U here. The Reynolds Lecture is sponsored by Continuing Education and The Office of Engagement.

 

S@7LogojpgSUNDAYS @ 7
J.S. BACH, BRANDENBERG CONCERTI 2, 3, 5, & 6

Sunday, Jan. 20, 7 p.m.
School of Music, Gardner Hall
Sundays @7 are free, one hour concerts featuring School of Music faculty. Parking is free and readily available on Sundays. 

 

 

ShatnerLargeWebBanner-416x163[1]SHATNER’S WORLD
Tuesday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall
William Shatner’s acclaimed one-man show takes audiences on a voyage through his life and career, from Shakespearean stage actor to internationally known icon, known as much for his unique persona as for his expansive body of work on television and film. Staff and faculty save 15 percent on tickets in any price range by purchasing in person at the Kingsbury Hall box office or the Olpin Union information desk (limit 2 per U ID).

 Find additional information here.

Announcements of interest

police_badgeCATALYTIC CONVERTERS ARE A CAMPUS TARGET FOR CAR VANDALS
Imagine this scene: You walk to your car, start it up, and suddenly it starts making a strange sound. The dashboard warning lights signal a problem. Someone may have swiped your catalytic converter—making you the victim of an increasingly common form of car vandalism. Catalytic converters are valuable to thieves because they are made of precious metals and can be sold for $600 or more. This kind of vandalism is hard to detect because it doesn’t require thieves to enter the vehicle. The suspects often work in pairs—one is a lookout, while the other quickly removes the converter from underneath the vehicle. From May 2009 to the present, catalytic converter thefts on campus have been taken exclusively from Nissan and Toyota trucks. Large parking lots are the most common location for thefts, particularly O lots and the hospital parking terrace. During 2012, there were 12 converter thefts on campus. As of today, there haven’t been any prosecutions for those thefts.

Helpful tips:

  • Report people who drive through parking lots with no intention of parking (driving by many open parking places), or those who stop by or walk around Toyota or Nissan 4-wheel drive trucks.
  • Report anyone who is under a vehicle.
  • Park your own vehicle near a camera or a heavily traveled area.
  • Report odd or unusual behavior in parking lots to 801-585-2677.

This message is brought to you by University Police. 

 

story-kara-arnold-91450[1]_

Kara Arnold

U SCIENCE GRAD HOPES TO BECOME MISS AMERICA
Kara Arnold, who spent the past year serving as Miss Utah, graduated from the U last year with a degree in chemistry and a minor in music. Now she’s about to leave for the Miss America Pageant. If she loses, she’ll go straight to medical school. If she wins, she’ll continue to promote her platform for education: “Discover Your Potential – Step Up with STEM” (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Watch the 2013 Miss America Pageant live on ABC on Jan. 12, 2013. Read the UNews release.

 

 

 

SERVICE AWARDS LUNCH TO HONOR LONGTIME STAFF
Nearly 185 staff members will be recognized for their years of service (25, 30, 35 and 40 years) at a lunch hosted by David W. Pershing on Tuesday, Jan. 15, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Olpin Union Ballroom. A list of recipients may be found online. Guest tickets are available for $15 each. RSVP to Terri Crow (801-585-0928) before noon on Jan. 11, 2013.

 

Nalini Nadkarni

Nalini Nadkarni

CNN SPOTLIGHTS ‘TREE EVANGELIST’ NALINI NADKARNI
Nalini Nadkarni, a professor of biology and director of the Center for Science and Math Education (CSME) recently was featured on a CNN program titled The Next List. The program highlights some of the details of the work at CSME and also Nadkarni’s own research and science communication efforts prior to her move to Utah to join the U faculty. Watch it here. 

 

 

 

Suit-Drive-GeneralBUSINESS SUIT DRIVE
Collecting until Friday, Jan. 11
In an effort to assist U students—both women and men—in making the best impression with potential employers at upcoming career fairs and job interviews, and in work experiences, Career Services is launching its “Suit Up!” business suit drive. Gently worn and/or new business suits are needed, as well as monetary donations, which will be used to purchase additional suits. The business suits will be given to students at no charge, so help Career Services extend this opportunity to as many students as possible by participating. Suits and/or monetary donations may be dropped off at the Career Services Office, Room 350, Student Services Building. For additional information, contact Kelly Dries (801-585-5059) or Valery Pozo (801-585-3338). 

 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS: LINDA K. AMOS AWARD
Due Friday, Jan. 25 at noon
The Office for Equity and Diversity, the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women, and the Women’s Week 2013 Committee request nominations for the 15th annual Linda K. Amos Award for Distinguished Service to Women. The award recognizes a female staff or faculty member who has selflessly given time and energy to improve the educational and/or working environment for women at the U. Send nomination materials via email to Amos Award. Learn more about how to submit a nomination

 

iStock_money_signSmallOPPORTUNITY: COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH GRANT
Due Feb. 15
The Community-Based Research (CBR) Grant seeks to fund research that has emerged from community-engaged work done in collaboration with community partners, and with reciprocal benefit from the research for both U and community partners (it does not fund the partnership/program work itself). The grant provides either one award of $20,000 or two of $10,000. If you have been involved in community-engaged work, you are encouraged to consider whether the grant could fund collaborative research projects you or your students are interested in pursuing. Those interested in applying should plan to attend a CBR Grant workshop on Thursday, Jan. 24, 12:30 p.m., at University Neighborhood Partners (1060 South 900 West). Link to the CBR Grant here. RSVP for the workshop to Sarah Monro (801-972-3596).

 

campus_rec_8P5C5383sm1-150x150[1]CAMPUS REC OFFERS SPRING FITNESS PROGRAMS 
The perfect place to accomplish your New Years resolution! Register now for fitness classes. A Fitpass is $60; 12-punch card is $38. A free week runs Jan. 7-13. Check out the group X classes for free! Classes include Zumba, Usanity, Turbo Kick, RIPPED, Body Works, TRX, Butts & Guts, Body Pump, Ballet Barre, Dance Fit, Belly Dance, Pilates, Yoga, Indoor Cycling, Adult Swim, and more. For details on classes, personal training, and other fitness opportunities, and to register online, check the Campus Rec website. 

 

WINTER 2012-13 CONTINUUM NOW AVAILABLE
The new issue of Continuum magazine invites you to explore the wonders of the U’s rare books—one of the top and most accessible collections in the West. You’ll also learn about how the U’s health care system is preparing for the federal Affordable Care Act’s many changes. And you can read about Utah Athletics’ five-year plan to bring U facilities to the Pac-12 level. You’ll also get to know U professor Sam Wilson, who melds whimsy and discipline in his art; and U alumna Lindsay Zanno, a young star in paleontology who seeks clues to the future in the fossils of the past.

 

 

 

COTM-Annoucement-12.1.2012TAPPING PAYS OFF FOR COMMUTER OF THE MONTH
From a pool of more than 5,000 eligible participants, James Clark, a pharmacy student, was selected Commuter of the Month for December 2012. Clark won a new i-Pad, courtesy of Commuter Services. Remember to tap on/tap off at least 10 days each month to be automatically entered into the contest. Check the Commuter Services website for details.

 

 

TOP 10 MOST READ FYI NEWS ARTICLES IN 2012 

# 10. U.S. News Rankings are out
# 9. Update on UDOT repaving project
# 8. Utah State Legislature 2012 report
# 7. Jay Leno coming to campus for UMFA’s Speed exhibit
# 6. Drop, Cover, Hold on—Evacuate!
# 5. Do you drive on Sunnyside Ave?
# 4. Holiday gift ideas from campus
# 3. Voice mail at the U is changing
# 2. UTA says tap/on/tap off…or else
# 1. Update on UDOT repaving project  

 


STUDY PARTICIPANTS WANTED


Recruiting females with major depression

The Brain Institute is conducting an IRB-approved study for females ages 13-21 with major depressive disorder who are taking an elective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) medication but are not feeling better. While maintaining current SSRI treatment regimen, subjects will be treated with the nutritional supplement, creatine. After a screening visit, subjects will participate in eight study visits, including two MRI scans of their brain over a 10-week period. Participants will be compensated for their time. For more information contact Lauren Forrest (801-587-1549). 

Men and women age 21 and older who are overweight or have diabetes
Participants are needed for an IRB-approved study sponsored by the U’s Molecular Medicine Program. Men and women age 21 and older who are overweight or have Type 2 diabetes are needed. The study is looking at platelets and how they are affected by diabetes. Participation involves three study visits where information will be gathered on the participant’s health status (such as medications, illnesses), a urinary analysis, and blood samples. Participants will be compensated for their time. For more information contact the study coordinator (801-581-6983).

Catalytic converters are targets for campus vandals

police_badgeImagine this scene: You walk out to your car, start it up, and leave campus. Everything seems fine until suddenly your car starts making a strange sound and the dashboard warning lights signal a problem. Someone may have swiped your catalytic converterand you may have been the target of an increasingly common form of car vandalism.

Catalytic converters are valuable to thieves because they are made of precious metals like platinum and palladium as part of the exhaust system to control vehicle emissions. They can be sold for $600 or more. This kind of vandalism is hard to detect because it does not require thieves to enter the vehicle. The suspects often work in pairs—one as a lookout, while the other quickly cuts the converter from underneath the vehicle.

catalytic converterAccording to U police, from May 2009 to the present, catalytic converter thefts on campus have been taken exclusively from Nissan and Toyota trucks. Large parking lots are the most common location for thefts, particularly O lots and the hospital parking terrace. During 2012, there were 12 converter thefts on campus. As of today, there haven’t been any prosecutions for those thefts.

Helpful tips:

  • Report people who are driving through parking lots who have no intention of parking (driving by many open parking places), or those who stop by or walk around Toyota or Nissan 4-wheel drive trucks.
  • Report anyone who is under a vehicle.
  • If possible, park your own vehicle near a camera or a heavily traveled area.
  • Report odd or unusual behavior in parking lots by calling 801-585-2677.

This message is brought to you by University Police.

Deans Chodosh and Rudd to leave the U

Hiram Chodosh

Hiram Chodosh

Law dean selected as president of Claremont McKenna College 

Law dean Hiram Chodosh has been selected the new president of Claremont McKenna College in Southern California, effective July 1, 2013. The S.J. Quinney College of Law will begin a search for a new dean soon.

“Hiram has made tremendous contributions to our campus during his tenure,” said President David W. Pershing. “He led the initiative to create a new and innovative facility for the Quinney College of Law and has been instrumental in the development of the University’s new global initiative. On behalf of the entire U community, I want to thank him for his leadership and wish him great success in his new role in Southern California.”

As dean of the College of Law, Chodosh has promoted leadership experiences for students, clinical and simulated skills training, and interdisciplinary learning. “I am both humbled and honored to be named the next president of Claremont McKenna College,” said Chodosh. “However, I will dearly miss my colleagues, students, and friends at the U and feel great pride in all we have accomplished together.”

 Read the UNews release.

 

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David Rudd

Dean of Social and Behavioral Science named Provost at University of Memphis 

M. David Rudd, dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Science since 2009, has been named provost of the University of Memphis. A search for a new dean for the U’s largest college will begin immediately.

“David has been a creative force on the University of Utah campus,” says President Pershing. “Among his outstanding contributions was the creation of the National Center for Veterans Studies, a source of research and support for those who serve our country. I am pleased to announce that the center will continue to reside at the U and we will build on David’s achievement through a new partnership with the University of Memphis.”  

“I am looking forward to the challenges of this new position in Memphis,” says Rudd, a psychologist by training, and a nationally recognized researcher in clinical suicidology. “I am proud of what we have accomplished in the college and will greatly miss my colleagues and students at the University of Utah from whom I have learned a great deal. I hope the new partnership between Utah and Memphis in the service of our military veterans will be just one of many continued collaborations.”

Read the UNews release.

Kudos

Enrique Aleman

ENRIQUE ALEMAN NAMED AVP FOR STUDENT EQUITY AND DIVERSITY
Enrique Aleman has been selected as assistant vice president for student equity and diversity. As an associate professor of educational leadership and policy at the U, Aleman will contribute to the continuing success in improving retention support programs for underrepresented students. Over the last decade, the percentage of underrepresented students of color at the U has doubled, and the diversity of the entering first-year students now exceeds the diversity of graduating seniors in Utah’s public high schools. Students who participate in the U’s diversity programs have a graduation rate nearly double that of the U’s underrepresented students who do not participate.

 

Ernest Volinn

ERNEST VOLINN RECEIVES FULBRIGHT AWARD
Ernest Volinn, research associate professor, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to do research at West China Hospital in Chengdu during the 2012-2013 academic year. Volinn will assess outcomes of acupuncture for back pain and will explore whether outcomes in China differ from outcomes in western countries, including the U.S. Volinn is one of approximately 1,100 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program this academic year. For more than 60 years, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has funded and supported programs that seek to promote mutual understanding and respect between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.

 

fernando_portrait_small

Fernando Rubio

TWO FROM COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES RECEIVE AWARDS
Fernando Rubio and Anne Lair, both from the Department of Languages and Literature in the College of Humanities, recently were honored at the national American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) conference—Rubio for excellence in foreign language instruction using technology, and Lair for excellence in the teaching of culture.

Anne_square

Anne Lair

Rubio is co-director of the U’s new Second Language Teaching and Research Center (L2TReC), where Lair is also involved.

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