November 5, 2008

University announces $1.2 billion fundraising campaign

On Oct. 25, the University of Utah launched its most ambitious fundraising campaign ever. Together We Reach: The Campaign for the University of Utah was unveiled at an event attended by more than 1,100 of the University’s most loyal and enthusiastic supporters.

The event marked the public announcement of a $1.2 billion fundraising campaign that will benefit people and programs throughout the University. Campaign counting began in July 2005 and to date, more than 193,000 gifts and pledge payments totaling $557 million have been received. The public phase of the campaign is scheduled to run through 2013.

An extremely generous leadership gift of $15 million to name the James L. Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building was announced during the campaign kickoff celebration.

Gifts to the campaign will not only build buildings, but create endowed chairs, professorships, and lectureships; scholarships and fellowships; study abroad and service learning opportunities; and research funds that will benefit faculty and students at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Seventeen families and individual donors already have made gifts and commitments to the campaign of $5 million or more.

Noting the current economic climate, President Young told donors the University “has surmounted enormous obstacles from its inception. Through good times and bad, the University has helped build Utah’s economy, enlarge our understanding of our common humanity, and relieve human suffering. That is our role and our commitment, and with the continued generous philanthropic support of our alumni and friends, that will be our future.”


How far should we go in protecting ourselves from terrorism?

Conflict in the 21st century—symbolized by the violent acts of 9/11—has forever changed our landscape at home and abroad. The rise of violence by non-state actors presents strategic and wide-ranging challenges for states operating in a world where international law seems to have become irrelevant, if not anachronistic. Can we protect ourselves from terrorism? Where should governments draw the line between satisfying public demands and expectations for security and maintaining democratic values? 

These and other questions about national security and individual liberties will be discussed by a broad range of experts at this year’s Siciliano Forum on Nov. 12 and 13. Distinguished visitors and resident scholars come together to ask a provocative question:  “How Far Should We Go in Protecting Ourselves From Terrorists?” 

Statesman Lee Hamilton, head of the Woodrow Wilson International Center and vice-chair of the 9/11 Commission sets the stage with the opening keynote on the progress and problems in homeland security since 9/11. The address Wednesday evening is by invitation only.

On Thursday, Margaret Warner, senior correspondent on Public Broadcasting’s The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, will moderate a program at 12:30 p.m. in the OSH auditorium with talks by three U policy and legal experts. Bruce Hoffman asks “Does Terrorism Work?” Amos Guiora poses “Self Defense: A Critical Re-examination,” and Chibli Mallat suggests “Non Violence as an Effective Policy.” For details, call 581-8620 or check online (hotlink to  http://www.csbs.utah.edu/siciliano_forum.html). You won’t want to miss this year’s lecture, which is free and open to the public.


12 Questions for Kelly Bricker
Kelly Bricker and her husband, Nate, are both associate professors in the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism.

Kelly is chair and executive director of The International Ecotourism Society. Her research interest is sustainable tourism and recreation.

1. What book should every person read and why?
I think every American should read Wilderness and the American Mind by Roderick Nash because it’s about where we came from as a nation and how we’re different from the rest of the world—American heritage at its best. Then, a must read for health and awareness of foods we eat is Skinny Bitch (hotlink to http://www.skinnybitch.net/) by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin.

2. What building on campus do you think is the most interesting architecturally? 
I love the old buildings surrounding Presidents Circle—the theater, administration building, museum. While perhaps not the most architecturally interesting, for me they embody the institution of learning—symbols of heritage. I wish all the buildings held some sense of the “historic-ness” these have.

3. If you could meet any legendary person, who would it be?
Ansel Adams. Not only one of the greatest photographers of all time, but also an accomplished pianist. He embraced the beauty of nature and worked hard to capture it in his photos and protect it in his activism. He is a great American hero.

4. How will the next generation of scholars—today’s students—change your field in the decades to come?
I hope our students…

  • Encourage society to place a high value on recreation, the natural environment, and sustainable tourism and ecosystems as a part of what constitutes the health of our ecosystem, which in my view includes humanity.
  • Hold a passion for living—and that they will advocate for all human beings to have access to quality of life, biodiversity, economic sustainability, and preservation of cultural heritage. 
  • Continue to serve diverse populations, and responsibly manage our environmental, human, economic, and social-cultural resources.
  • Inspire their students and find passion in their personal and professional lives. With more resources, science, and understanding of the world they can use technology and multi-disciplinary approaches to bring about positive and productive changes throughout the world.

5. Name a favorite place to eat.
Sawadee Thai Restaurant.

6. Will a liberal arts education remain relevant to students in our increasingly technological society?
Absolutely. Bio-cultural diversity is the key to our past and future. Without it, we cannot sustain life.

7. List two of your favorite Web sites.
http://www.ecotourism.org
http://www.lohas.com

8. What reading material is on your bedside table?
Books I never seem to have time to read until late in the evenings:  Green to Gold: How Smart Companies Use Environmental Strategy to Innovate, Create Value, and Build Competitive Advantage, by Daniel C. Esty and Andrew S. Winston; Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace… One School at a Time by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin; and Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution—and How It Can Renew America by Thomas L. Friedman.

9. If politicians had to pass an exam before they were allowed to serve in public office, what question would you add to the test?
As president of the United States, would you take an oath (that if broken is punishable by law) to provide a high quality of life for all Americans by conserving the health of ecosystems—and place this action above pure economic gain?

10. What is one thing you would like to ask people to do to change the world for the better?
Commit to serve others, commit to sustaining the environment, commit to a cause simply because it is the right thing to do.

11. Among the complex moral and political issues that affect humanity, which do you believe will never be resolved and why?
I am forever hopeful…one must be. Perhaps not resolved in my lifetime, but I do believe we have the capacity to resolve any problem facing our world today.

12. What’s the best advice you ever got?
Never stop moving forward, even when it’s uphill, uncomfortable, or even painful. Keep moving forward—never ever stop moving. Thanks for that, Doc!


Veterans Day is Nov. 11

Veterans Day Commemoration Program
Tuesday, Nov. 11

Join the U community in honoring our Utah veterans. All events are free and open to the public. Photos and biographies of this year’s 11 honorees are online (hotlink to http://www.veteransday.utah.edu). For more information, call 585-9244.

EVENT SCHEDULE

8:45 - 10:45 a.m.
Panel Discussion: Medic!
Olpin Union, Panorama East

11:00 a.m.
Full Dress Military Ceremony
Olpin Union, Ballroom

1:30 p.m.
U.S. Army Medical Corps History
Olpin Union, Ballroom
Presenter: Tom McMasters, Director, U.S. Army Medical Department Museum, Fort Sam Houston

7:00 p.m.
53rd Annual Veterans Day Concert
Utah National Guard 23rd Army Band
Jon M. Huntsman Center

 

Medal of Honor recipient receives diploma
On May 3, Retired Col. Bernard Francis Fisher (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Francis_Fisher), a Medal of Honor (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medal_of_Honor) recipient, received his diploma in fine arts from the U of U during a commissioning ceremony for second lieutenants from ROTC Detachment 850, almost 57 years after he originally attended the University. J. Steven Ott, dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, awarded the diploma. Fisher was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Lyndon B. Johnson on Jan. 19, 1967 for personal action above and beyond the call of duty when he risked his life to save a fellow pilot who was shot down in 1966 during action in the A Shau Valley (hotlink to http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~tpilsch/AirOps/AShau.html) of Vietnam.

During the battle, Fisher landed his Douglas A-IE Skyraider (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-1_Skyraider) on an airfield controlled by the enemy under intense ground fire, pulled a downed pilot from the wreckage and took him aboard his aircraft, successfully escaping despite several bullets striking the plane. The aircraft Colonel Fisher was flying that day is displayed at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force (hotlink to http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

Born in San Bernardino, Fisher was raised and educated in Utah, calling Clearfield home, though he now lives in Kuna, Idaho. He was the first living Air Force recipient of the Medal of Honor and the first of 12 Air Force members to receive the medal for service in Vietnam.

—From an article by Senior Airman Brok McCarthy in the Fall 2008 Focus on  the Human Factor, a publication of the College of Social and Behavioral Science.


Know Your U—History 101

Since 1900 when campus moved up to the “hill” the need for a women’s dorm was viewed as essential, but the funding didn’t materialize. In 1933 during the Great Depression there was a proposal for the University to borrow from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Finance_Corporation) to help fund the dorm’s construction, but the Utah State Legislature killed the proposal. The dream was realized when Mary P. Carlson donated $121,519.22 to the U to build the women’s dorm and asked that it be named in honor of her husband, August W. Carlson. In 1934 President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal) added $90,000 to the project through the Public Works Administration (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Works_Administration) and this time, the request was accepted by the Legislature. Carlson Hall, built in the “Adapted Modern Italian” style, was completed in 1938 and had its housewarming on Oct. 8. Carlson Hall is currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places (hotlink to http://www.nps.gov/nr).

        —Paul Mogren, Librarian


Great news for campus cyclers

New bike lanes—with striping, stenciling, and signage—are now in place from the Heritage Center to the Student Services Building. Construction of the Sutton Geosciences Building has caused the bike path to stop there, temporarily, on its route to the Merrill Engineering Building. Feedback from people on campus has been positive (the painting crew has received compliments from students, faculty, staff, and visitors for implementing the bike lanes). A bike parade on Thursday, Oct. 30 commemorated the new bike lane with cyclists riding from the Union Plaza to the Heritage Center. To see the new bike route, visit www.sustainability.utah.edu/bikemap.htm (hotlink to http://www.sustainability.utah.edu/bikemap.htm). For more information, visit the Bicycle Collective at www.ubike.org (hotlink to http://www.ubike.org/).

Kingsbury Hall offers discounts

Some good news in this volatile economic time—Kingsbury Hall offers a
25 percent discount to faculty and staff for the following performances:

The African Children’s Choir
(Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m.)
A choir of AIDS orphans from Uganda serves as ambassadors for the 11 million children in Africa orphaned by the disease. The concert is a celebration of youth and talent and affords the children a chance to give back to their homeland through funds raised. See the choir online (hotlink to www.youtube.com/watch?v=RC62N5hwX4s).

The Kronos Quartet’s Sun Rings
(Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.)
Sun Rings was commissioned by NASA and features the Grammy-award winning quartet paired with actual intergalactic sounds recorded deep in the cosmos. The performance includes The University of Utah Singers. Hear the Kronos Quartet online (hotlink to www.youtube.com/watch?v=Flo15MdyABc).

• Lar Lubovitch Dance Company
(Nov. 18, 7:30 p.m.)
The New York Times calls Lubovitch “one of the 10 best choreographers in the world,” and Variety calls it a national treasure. In their first tour in 10 years—which may be their last—the dances are musical, rhapsodic, and sophisticated and convey deeply felt human emotion. See Lar Lubovitch Dance Company online (hotlink to www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jfLbwgIUDk).

For more information, contact the Kingsbury Hall ticket office (hotlink to http://www.kingsburyhall.org) or call 581-7100.


Upcoming on Campus

• MCMURRIN LECTURE
“The Journey into Islam: The Crisis of Globalization,” with Akbar Ahmed
Thursday, Nov. 6, 7:00 p.m.
Jewish Community Center
The BBC calls Akbar Ahmed “the world’s leading authority on contemporary Islam.” Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington, D.C., he is an author and award-winning film director, former high commissioner of Pakistan to Great Britain, and advisor to world leaders on Islam. For more information contact the Tanner Humanities Center (hotlink to http://www.hum.utah.edu/humcntr) or call 581-7989.

• KUED THANK YOU GIFT SALE
Friday, Nov. 7, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Eccles Broadcast Center, Dumke Boardroom
What’s nicer than a garage sale, classier than a swap meet, and more affordable than an estate sale? It’s KUED’s sale of leftover thank-you gifts. You’ll find Curious George, Sesame Street dolls, Hailey’s Hints books, and music CDs (including some by Bob Dylan). Prices range from $5 to $10. For more information, contact Michelle at 581-3284.

 

• ART AND THE BRAIN SYMPOSIUM
Saturday, Nov. 8, 10 a.m. – 12 noon (Breakfast 9 – 10 a.m.)
Utah Museum of Fine Arts
The Later Works of William Utermohlen, now on display at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (hotlink to http://www.umfa.utah.edu), is an art exhibition that chronicles an artist’s personal experience with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia through a series of self-portraits created from the date of his diagnosis in 1995 until the year 2000 when he could no longer paint. The symposium, led by Norman Foster, director of the Center for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research (hotlink to http://uuhsc.utah.edu/cacir/), features two lectures. Kenneth Rockwood (hotlink to http://communications.medicine.dal.ca/newsroom/release44rockwood.htm), a professor and medical doctor, discusses his artist-in-residence program at a memory disability clinic in Halifax, Canada; and Joseph Diaz, of the Brain Builders Alzheimer’s Research Program at LDS Hospital, talks about how Alzheimer’s patients see and communicate their place in the world by highlighting Uterhohlen’s artwork. For more information, call 585-1306 or check online (hotlink to http://umfa.utah.edu/utermohlen).

• NEW WEBMASTER ORIENTATION
Monday, Nov. 10, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Eccles Broadcast Center, Dumke Board Room
The Office of the Senior Vice President for Information Technology and the University Webmaster are sponsoring a webmaster orientation (hotlink to: http://web.utah.edu/uwebresources/invitations/invite_f22.html) to introduce new webmasters to University web policies, best practices, and resources available to assist them with managing their websites. New webmasters are encouraged to attend as well as other members of the University web community who might benefit from a refresher. The event is free, but seating is limited, so register early! (hotlink to http://web.utah.edu/uwebresources/forms/form_f22_reg.html) Topics will include:

- Policies & Procedures
- University website branding
- Website accessibility
- Security practices
- University search engine
- Implementing e-commerce
- Marriott Library online resources
- University events calendar

If you have questions call 581-6113 or contact the University webmaster (hotlink to: webmaster@utah.edu).

 

• 2008 PAWS N’ CLAWS BAZAAR
Thursday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Eccles Institute of Human Genetics, 1st floor
(East of the Eccles Health Sciences Library)
Have some fun shopping while supporting the adoption of U of U retired research animals. You’ll find jewelry, pottery, batiks, and watercolor prints; homemade soaps, jams and breads—and of course all things themed dog and cat: coats, beds, collars, leashes, socks, gloves... See the dogs and cats available for adoption. For more information, contact Linda Schmidt at linda.schmidt@hsc.utah.edu or call 554-5304. A portion of all sales will benefit the development fund for the retired research animals (tax deductible).  

• LYCEUM II LECTURE: FROM THE ARCTIC TO THE EVERGLADES
With Peter Matthiessen and Subhankar Banerjee

Thursday, Nov. 13, 7 p.m.
City Library
The College of Humanities Environmental Humanities Program and the Salt Lake City Library welcome Peter Matthiessen (hotlink to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Matthiessen) and Subhankar Banerjee (hotlink to http://www.subhankarbanerjee.org/banerjee.html), presenters for the 2008 Lyceum II Lecture. Matthiessen, a prolific writer and premier naturalist, won the 1987 National Book Award for The Snow Leopard. Indian born artist-educator-activist Subhankar Banerjee uses photography to raise awareness about issues that threaten the health and well-being of our planet. The Lyceum II Lecture series, now in its sixth year, is modeled after Ralph Waldo Emerson’s famous Lyceum lectures, with a focus on environmental issues as they relate to the Humanities. Each lecture aims to illustrate the power of place and explore the integration of community, culture, and landscape. More information is available online (hotlink to http://www.hum.utah.edu) or call 581-6214.

• GRIEF AND THE HOLIDAYS
TURNING LOSS INTO MEANING

Tuesday, Nov. 18, 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Education Building, Alumni Hall
Have you lost a friend or family member? If so, the College of Nursing’s Caring Connections (hotlink to http://www.nurs.utah.edu/practice/caringconnections/index.html) is offering an opportunity to gather with others to talk about ideas for navigating the holiday season while keeping the memories of your loved one alive. Hear from Karen Hale, communications director for Salt Lake City, on how grief affects our experience of the winter holidays; and a reading by award-winning author and poet Emma Lou Thayne. “We hope to provide a supportive venue during the holiday season where individuals can honor their loved ones, reflect on their loss, and look ahead,” says Kathie Supiano, director of Caring Connections. For additional information, call 581-3414.


Bulletin Board

•  Attention Researchers!
Planning to get that grant in on time? Then don’t forget to register for the new version of Scifinder Scholar by Nov. 15. All six seats will be moved to the new Scifinder Scholar by mid-November and users will lose access if they have not made the switch. The Marriott Library and the Eccles Health Sciences Library have updated their websites to include information on how to access the new version.Register online (hotlink to http://tyr.scl.utah.edu/scifi) using a U of U computer and your U of U email account. The database is licensed for use only by U of U faculty, students, and staff. Questions? Contact Daureen Nesdill (hotlink to daureen.nesdill@utah.edu) or call 581-7533.

•  Reward!
Lost on Oct. 14 from West Terrace, School of Medicine, University Hospital, or Primary Children’s Medical Center: A small gray cloth drawstring bag containing a nearly-completed hand knit shawl in dark red lace-weight wool. The shawl is still on circular needles inside the bag and was to be a Christmas gift for a great grandmother. If found, please contact Teri Jo Mauch (hotlink to teri.mauch@hsc.utah.edu) or call 244-1728.

•  Holiday Gift Ideas from Campus
FYI’s annual holiday listing will be included in the Dec. 3 FYI News. If your college, department, or center will be inviting food or clothing donations or offering holiday gifts or other items for sale, send information to FYI (hotlink to fyi@ucomm.utah.edu) by Nov. 24.

•  Campus Store: No more notices by mail
As of Dec. 4, the University Campus Store will no longer send notices of sales, events, or promotions, by campus mail. If you would like to continue to be notified by email, sign up online (hotlink to http://www.campusstore.utah.edu) by going to the Campus Store website and clicking on Events for U.


FYI Mystery Photo Contest

Current Mystery Photo

FYI Mystery Photo

Where is this on campus? Send your answer (be specific) to FYI@ucomm.utah.edu by 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 10 for a chance to win two tickets to Kingsbury Hall's production of the Kronos Quartet's Sun Rings, courtesy of the Kingsbury Hall. The winner will be randomly selected from the pool of those submitting the correct answer and will be listed in the Nov. 19 FYI News.

Thanks to Red Butte Garden for providing the prize!

Note: This contest is open to U of U faculty and staff only.

Last issue’s FYI Mystery Photo Contest answer

Cropped Mystery Photo

Oct. 22
Mystery Photo

Whole Mystery Photo

Click on photo for
larger image


The Oct. 22 FYI Mystery Photo shows the new Goodwill Social Work Building located south of the library.

Congratulations to Michael Sonntag, winner of the Oct. 22, 2008 FYI Mystery Photo Contest! Michael is the supervisor of the fiber optic network for the University. Fiber optics are the cables that carry the computer information, voice conversations, video signals, and other instruments’ information across the campus or to the Internet. Michael was randomly selected from the pool of contestants who sent in the correct answer. He received a pass for two to Red Butte Garden, courtesy of the Garden. A big thanks to Red Butte Garden for donating the passes. And thanks to everyone who participated in the contest. We invite you to try your luck with each issue this fall.

 

U SAVING ENERGY

Sustainability Tip

Since the University’s behavioral energy saving program began in July 2003 the U has saved the CO2 emissions equivalent of 9,237 acres of pine forest storing CO2 for one year.

Whenever you leave a room even for a few minutes, turn the lights off. Classroom, conference room, and office lights are often left on needlessly when rooms are empty. This increases energy use for lighting, and it increases energy use for building cooling. Take advantage of natural lighting. Many offices, labs, classrooms, and hallways have exterior windows that provide ample lighting. Turning the lights off during daylight periods and leaving shades open helps keep electric use down. For questions, suggestions or comments, contact Bianca Shama (hotlink to Bianca.shama@fm.utah.edu) or call 585-1171.